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Grad Student News
It famously took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts to settle on a practical design for the incandescent light bulb. If each crack at a solution had cost him hundreds of millions of dollars, however, he might not have been so keen on using a build ‘em and bust ‘em approach.
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News
Perhaps it should come as no surprise that the acronym for the environmental nanotechnology center headquartered at Duke is pronounced “saint.” After all, the inspiration for the center struck while founder Mark Wiesner was on sabbatical in France—a  nation renowned...
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Undergrad Student News
Growing up, Emily Briere didn’t have an adequate outlet to pour her enthusiasm for space exploration into. That’s a problem she intends to fix for the generation growing up behind her.
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Faculty News
Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal....
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News
In Raleigh Wednesday night, the National Engineering Forum (NEF), along with North Carolina State University and Duke University, hosted a regional dialogue aimed at finding solutions to the top challenges facing American engineering. The dialogue brought together executive...
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Faculty News
For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras...
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Faculty News
Duke engineers have devised a way to improve the efficiency of lithotripsy—the demolition of kidney stones using focused shock waves. After decades of research, all it took was cutting a groove near the perimeter of the shock wave-focusing lens and changing its curvature.
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Faculty News
Using little more than a few perforated sheets of plastic and a staggering amount of number crunching, Duke engineers have demonstrated the world’s first three-dimensional acoustic cloak. The new device reroutes sound waves to create the impression that both the cloak and...

Duke Engineering

The Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University is a vibrant teaching and research institution focused on exploring the frontiers of engineering. In addition to providing a comprehensive engineering program, our students are encouraged to pursue a multidisciplinary course of study suited to their interests and talents. We view teaching as a partnership where students and faculty share the responsibility to excel.

We offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in biomedical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical engineering. We also offer professional masters degrees in engineering and engineering management, as well as several certificates in specific areas, like aerospace engineering and energy and the environment.

Over the past ten years, Pratt has been among the fastest-growing engineering schools of the top-tier schools, and over the past three years, we have been the fastest-rising in U.S.News & World Report rankings of top engineering schools. We invite you to explore this site and see for yourself what we're all about.

Celebrating 75 Years of Duke Engineering

Duke Forward