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Two degrees plus two scan energies and one heavy metal equals a new way to detect dangerous plaques in the coronary arteries. Potentially. Jeffrey Ashton, a biomedical engineering graduate student in Duke University’s  MD-PhD program, has won an American Heart Association Fellowship to develop a new contrast agent for CT scans. Not only would the agent be able to detect plaque buildup in arteries, but also reveal how likely the plaque is to rupture and cause a heart attack or stroke.
The PhD Plus Program is designed to assist graduate students in making effective career decisions in industry, consulting, government or academia. Recently Dean Katsouleas and CEE PhD candidate Sarah Diringer wrote about the value of the program for Forbes. Read the original version at Forbes, or see the text below. PhDs Ready-Made For The Business World By Tom Katsouleas and Sarah Diringer
It famously took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts to settle on a practical design for the incandescent light bulb. If each crack at a solution had cost him hundreds of millions of dollars, however, he might not have been so keen on using a build ‘em and bust ‘em approach.
Stephen Rosenzweig, a PhD candidate in Duke's Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded the first competitive Thurstone Medical Imaging Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering.
A Ph.D. in engineering, followed by years of postdoctoral study, has traditionally opened the door to an academic career focused on research and teaching—but more and more Ph.D. engineers are headed in other directions.  In fact, today, around 70 percent of Duke University’s engineering Ph.D. graduates head straight into non-academic fields, whether traditional engineering firms, device companies, consulting or even banking.
Entrepreneurship success stories abound in Duke’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Look at Advanced Liquid Logic: founded in 2004 by ECE graduate students Vamsee Pamula and Michael Pollack, the company was acquired in July 2013 by Illumina, Inc., which develops life science tools and integrated systems for analyzing genes.
Cell therapies may stop or reverse the pain and disability of degenerative disc disease and the loss of material between vertebrae, according to Duke University scientists.
Jim Shappell was on an airplane last winter the first time he gave “big data” much serious thought. Like many people, Shappell, Parsons Corporation’s Group Executive for Strategy and Business Development, was becoming familiar with the concept of big data. But some in-flight reading really got him thinking about its implications for the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry—in which Parsons is a multinational leader.
Duke University biomedical engineers and genome researchers have developed a proof-of-principle approach using light to detect infections before patients show symptoms. The approach was demonstrated in human samples, and researchers are now developing the technique for placement on a chip, which could provide fast, simple and reliable information about a patient. A diagnostic device based on this chip also could be made portable.
DURHAM, N.C. -- Using a novel genetic ‘editing’ technique, Duke University biomedical engineers have been able to repair a defect responsible for one of the most common inherited disorders, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, in cell samples from Duchenne patients.

In the Media

Jul 23, 2014
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Jul 23, 2014
Christian Science Monitor