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Determined to use their engineering skills to support their local Durham community, a group of Duke students received enough support in return to win a $10,000 grant for their project.
Connie Simmons is the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs at the Pratt School of Engineering. She started working at Duke University in 1978 and has held various positions over the years. She was hired by Aleksandar S. Vesic (dean of engineering from 1974-1982) and has served under four university presidents and six deans. After 37 years at Duke, she will retire in February 2015. DukEngineer spoke with her about her memories and legacy of service to students, faculty and staff.
The 5th Annual Mahato Memorial Event took place on Thursday, November 19, and left the Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine, and Applied Science (FCIEMAS) with beautiful works of art for its next public display. The event also featured the awarding of the annual Mahato fellowship to Zhihui Cheng, a doctoral candidate in electrical and computer engineering.
A dance major, theater major and electrical engineering major walk into a classroom together. While that may sound like the start of a bad joke in the DukEngineer, it actually happens three days a week in Duke’s Hull Dance Studio.
The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently released a list of 14 "Grand Challenges for Engineering" that must be addressed in order to achieve a sustainable, economically robust, and politically stable future for our children and our children's children.
As a Grand Challenges Scholar, I am uniting my penchant for physics and engineering with my passion for neuroscience and psychology toward the goal of Reverse-Engineering the Brain. I work in the laboratory of Marc Sommer, professor of biomedical engineering, studying the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on single neurons in non-human primates. TMS is a safe, noninvasive way of stimulating the brain that has proven effective in treating depression and shows promise for both...
A brain-to-brain interface connects one organism's brain to another to allow direct communication of neural data. Scary, right? But while words, vocal inflections and facial expressions are often misinterpreted, in a brain-to-brain interface, direct transmission of thoughts prevents any miscommunication. Not only is it faster, but it opens up a world of innovations for humanity. Imagine a military tactic where sensory information is received from a sparrow perched outside a terrorist compound.
My Grand Challenge Scholar research centers on the challenge of engineering the tools of scientific discovery. Although it is one of the less mentioned of the fourteen NAE grand challenges, I believe that it holds a crucial role in designing a better future.
As a member of the Grand Challenge Scholars Program, I am integrating all of my experience in technical research, interdisciplinary learning, service, entrepreneurship and global perspective to expand my knowledge and focus my capabilities to help solve the Grand Challenge of Engineering Better Medicines and Medical Technology. This is yet another building block through which I hope to use my double major in mechanical and biomedical engineering to make life better for someone.
As part of the NAE Grand Challenge Scholars Program, I am focusing on the challenge of providing clean drinking water access to all. My research project focuses specifically on the impact of using ceramic water filters (CWF) to treat contaminated drinking water in Uganda.