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Several months into her Pratt Undergraduate Fellowship, Katrina Wisdom (E’12) was handed a mailer by her faculty advisor, Chuan-Hua Chen, Alfred M. Hunt Faculty Scholar and assistant professor of mechanical engineering.
For those students with a keen interest in better understanding how human activity has impacted the world around us, Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering has launched a new major – Environmental Engineering. Because solving the world’s most pressing environmental problems will entail engineers working as a team with colleagues in different fields, the new degree, BSE (EnvE), will offer a broad range of non-engineering experiences.
Ever forget your contact case on a trip and you have nowhere to put your lenses? Pratt Engineering student Matt Pleatman and his co-founders have a solution for you: the Contact Lens Refresh Card, an ultra slim, all-in-one contact lens case and multipurpose solution carrier that fits into your wallet in the same way as a credit card.
Duke engineering junior Kushal Seetharam has been selected as a scholar by the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program.
Fracking. High gas prices. Global warming. Oil pipelines. Affordable, efficient home heating and cooling. Massive storm-related power outages. The world has many energy problems and few places to learn how to solve them. Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering has stepped up to help close the knowledge gap by offering a minor in energy engineering. Pratt students may apply beginning with the spring 2013 semester. Pratt professor Marc Deshusses, who co-chaired a team with associate professor Josiah...
Meet Cameron Kim – a Pratt Engineering student working on synthetic biology who also officiates for the Duke Quidditch team. Originally from Brandon, Florida, Cameron became interested in molecular biology and engineering in high school. "I see most people identify biomedical engineering as biomechanics, neural engineering, and electrophysiology,” he says, “but there’s really this other side growing quicker and quicker, which is using the tools of molecular biology to control how we as humans...
Doing laundry with rainwater while conducting research in the backyard green house. Checking up on the growth of the green roof as well as how much rainwater has collected in the six 400 gallon tanks in the basement. Observing wattage used by each room’s controlled lighting, while the hum of a self-mowing lawnmower makes its way by an open window near the lab adjacent to the kitchen. These are components that make up a normal day in the life of a student residing in the Duke University Smart...
Engineered to compete and aerodynamically designed for speed, imagine a car that can go from zero to 60 miles per hour in 3.8 seconds.  When it comes to racing, what else is there?
DURHAM, N.C. -- Just as a chameleon changes its color to blend in with its environment, Duke University engineers have demonstrated for the first time that they can alter the texture of plastics on demand, for example, switching back and forth between a rough surface and a smooth one. By applying specific voltages, the team has also shown that it can achieve this control over large and curved surface areas.
It makes perfect sense that Sidney Primas is double-majoring in biomedical engineering and electrical and computer engineering – his father suffered from the effects of a blood vessel disorder in his brain during a good portion of Primas’s childhood. Since then, Primas has been fascinated with the brain and its intricate network of nerves.

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