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Engineered to compete and aerodynamically designed for speed, imagine a car that can go from zero to 60 miles per hour in 3.8 seconds.  When it comes to racing, what else is there?
DURHAM, N.C. -- Just as a chameleon changes its color to blend in with its environment, Duke University engineers have demonstrated for the first time that they can alter the texture of plastics on demand, for example, switching back and forth between a rough surface and a smooth one. By applying specific voltages, the team has also shown that it can achieve this control over large and curved surface areas.
It makes perfect sense that Sidney Primas is double-majoring in biomedical engineering and electrical and computer engineering – his father suffered from the effects of a blood vessel disorder in his brain during a good portion of Primas’s childhood. Since then, Primas has been fascinated with the brain and its intricate network of nerves.
Watch Greer compete Thursday, Feb. 8, at 7. p.m. on the ABC network's Durham's affiliate WTVD-TV. Watch a sneak preview. ---
For Andrew Mang, the Grand Challenge Scholars Program was a natural fit. “I’ve always seen myself at the intersection of technology and business,” said Mang, a senior double majoring in mechanical engineering and economics and one of Duke’s National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenge Scholars. Mang’s interest in such topics has been evident since his first year at Duke, during which he joined a student group dedicated to international development. With the group, he contributed to...
Durham, NC - Without Duke's new scholarship program for international students, Laxmi Rajak says, "I would probably have been washing clothes at other people's houses like my mother does because she could never have afforded my further education." Rajak, a first-year student from Nepal, calls her scholarship "a wonderful opportunity that would otherwise have been denied to someone of my caste and economic status. Coming from a family that was not only poor but also treated as untouchable...
Americans by the millions rip open ketchup packets for their French Fries without even thinking twice about it. This simple act, however, could in the near future be a life-saver for a baby born in Africa of a mother infected with HIV, especially if the pouch is filled with anti-retroviral medications. Studies have consistently shown that if newborns receive these drugs shortly after birth, their chances of coming down with the disease can be cut significantly.
DURHAM, N.C. -- So much for tagging photographs with names, locations and activities yourself – a new cell phone application can take care of that for you. The system works by taking advantage of the multiple sensors on a mobile phone, as well as those of other mobile phones in the vicinity.
This past summer I worked for Precision Photonics, a relatively small laser optics company in my hometown of Boulder, CO. Its primary business is manufacturing optical components for laser applications in the telecom, defense, and R&D industries, to name a few. While I performed a wide variety of tasks, my primary responsibilities were remodeling the bill of materials (BOM) and costing methods, design and implementation of various parts and fixtures to improve the manufacturing process, and...
Balancing on the balls of her feet, her arms in a wide circle, senior Katrina Wisdom begins a ballet move called an attitude. She raises one leg, slightly bent, to ninety degrees without a wobble, to show how ballerinas intuitively feel physics. The dancers don't often know the mathematical equations describing their moves, but they know how to execute them with grace. If ballerinas didn't feel physics, they'd fall over. As an engineering major at Duke who has been dancing since the age of four...